5 Ways to Know You Need Drug Rehab

Have drugs or alcohol taken over your life?

Your immediate answer may be “no, of course not.” You could quit anytime you want. While you may say that to yourself, you know that you slip deeper and deeper into addiction every day.

If you or a loved one is abusing substances, you may try to turn the other cheek at first. Eventually, it gets to be too much.

Here are five definitive signs that drug rehab is the best option

 

1. You Spend All Your Money on Drugs

Before addiction took over, you used to spend your money responsibly. Now, most of your finances go toward paying for your addiction. Depending on which substance you’re abusing, you could be spending hundreds of dollars a day.

You’re running out of money. You’ve started to sell belongings just to afford your next high. While you know you could lose your home and/or car, you’re not concerned with that right now.

This is very risky behavior. You’re putting your future in danger.

2. You’ve Cut out Friends and Family

Your friends and family don’t understand your life since you’ve become addicted. All they do is judge you, so you don’t see them anymore.

As time goes by, you become more and more isolated. The only people you speak to are your drug dealers and fellow users. This keeps your downward spiral going.

3. You’ve Lost Your Job (or Are at Risk of Losing Your Job) Because of Your Addiction

When you were sober, you never missed a day of work unless you were sick. Now, you couldn’t care less about your attendance.

It’s hard for you to get out of bed in the morning when you’re hungover. You regularly show up to work late. Sometimes you don’t show up at all.

If you’re there, it’s tough to concentrate. You’re always thinking about your next high.

You know you’re going to lose your job soon. That will make it much more difficult to pay for your addiction.

4. You Can Never Get Enough

Your body can become used to drugs and alcohol. That means the usual amount just doesn’t do it for you anymore. You need more to feel the buzz.

Your addiction becomes life-threatening at this point. You could overdose, which can be deadly.

5. How Do You Know It’s Time for Drug Rehab? You Can’t Quit Alone

Perhaps you tried to stop using drugs or alcohol once. You realized your addiction was taking over your life so you withdrew at home.

Within a day, the pain and cravings were so strong you went right back to using again.

It’s generally inadvisable to withdraw at home without medical supervision. A rehab facility can help you through the difficulty that is detoxing from drugs. Once you get past that point, getting sober is a lot easier.

Do you need help overcoming your addiction to drugs or alcohol?

Physical dependence. Physical dependence on drugs can develop as people grow accustomed to the persistent presence and influence of the substance. The changes in physiology that accompany this process leave people feeling badly or functioning sub-optimally when the drug is no longer in the system.

Tolerance. Over time and with prolonged use, people can build up a tolerance to the drug, meaning they need more of the drug to achieve the desired effects.

Withdrawal symptoms. Some people experience withdrawal symptoms when they attempt to stop using abruptly or when they wean themselves off the drug over a period of time. This is the presence of a withdrawal syndrome indicates that physiologic dependence is at play.

Poor judgment. When an individual is addicted to drugs, he or she may do anything to obtain more, including risky behaviors such as stealing, lying, engaging in the unsafe sexual activity, selling drugs, or crimes that could land the person in jail.

Drug-seeking. People may spend excessive amounts of time and energy finding and be getting their drug of choice.

Financial trouble. People may spend large amounts of money, drain their bank accounts, and go outside their budgets in order to get the drug. This is a major red flag.

Neglect responsibilities. When people choose using or getting the drug over meeting work or personal obligations, this is a classic sign of addiction.

Develop unhealthy friendships. When people start using new substances, they may spend time with others who have similar habits. They may hang out with a new group of people who may encourage unhealthy habits.

Isolate. Alternatively, they may withdraw and isolate themselves, hiding their drug use from friends and family. Some reasons for this may include perceived stigma or increased depression, anxiety, or paranoia as a result of their drug addiction.

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